I couldn’t write it better…

This week I wanted to write on chronic illness, to shed another bit of light into what makes me do the things I do, or the things I say. To let people know that when I am absent from conversation it is because I am in pain, not because I don’t listen. That when I decline a party invite it is because I genuinely can’t make it, not because I can’t be bothered. Or when I can’t eat at dinner it is because I am too nauseous, not that I don’t like your food (especially this one because I love food!)

This blog post is so beautifully articulated that I couldn’t write it better myself; whilst some people may argue it is “bagging” cancer, I don’t think it is. I do not wish ANY illness upon ANYONE, and I strongly believe all illnesses are bad, no matter what illness.

I think this blog truthfully portrays what it is like to live with constant sickness, with no end in sight and no answer. It is often harder than we make out… But it is not the worst thing in the world, for we are still here to live as much as we can.

The saying “It could be worse” is something that has kept me going through tough times. It is not that I am ranking different illnesses, moreover it is appreciating what I do have rather than what I have lost!

Anyway, please take the time to read this.. I love it, especially the last paragraph ❤

http://thoughtcatalog.com/lauren-anne/2014/08/what-its-really-like-to-be-chronically-ill/

Thought Catalog

Society’s recent obsession with cancer stories and movies like The Fault in Our Stars made me realize that the average person doesn’t know what it’s really like to be sick. Chronically sick. What it’s like to wake up every morning and know you’re never going to get better. No amount of medicine, doctors, surgeries, and procedures can fix you.

I think the reason why people today love to hear about cancer stories is because they are just that. They are stories. They have a beginning, middle, and an end. While that end may not be a happy one, people are satisfied with closure. But my story doesn’t have an end. And people don’t seem to like stories without an ending.

Being sick isn’t as glamorous as they make it out to be in the movies. And unlike cancer perks, there are no “chronic illness perks.” Except maybe those really good…

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